Home Based Business Made EAsy

Everyone wants to start their own business and become their own boss, but many do not know how to do it. There are several types of home-based businesses. Service companies, product sales, and web-based home-based businesses, to name a few.

In this article, I will walk you through the process of starting your own online home business. I will try to eliminate some of the mystery of the process. By following this guideline, you’ll be up and running in no time without making a huge investment.

First, you need to know what your business is going to do. Will he provide a service? Do you intend to sell products? These are the two general types of home-based online businesses I will discuss in this article.

If you plan to provide a service, what kind of service will you provide? Will it be provided to people who own websites? Will it be a service that everyone can use or will it be confined to your area?

Ask similar questions if you plan to sell a product. Will it be a product that you sell and deliver locally, nationally or internationally? If you choose around the world, do you know anything about shipping your product abroad? The same applies to national delivery. Do you know the costs associated with delivering your product anywhere in the country where you live?

Once you have answered these questions, you will have more of an idea on how your home web business will eventually be shaped.

Then you will need a domain name. Most people think that the name of their business is the best way to get a domain name, however, a generic domain name with keywords associated with your product or service will serve you a lot better. You can also register your company name as a domain name and direct it to your website, but it is not necessary.

The generic domain name can help you with search engine traffic and can be more memorable. This is just one of many factors that will help you with search engine optimization, but it’s a step you should take at startup. Example: Cars.com is a better domain name than Ford.com, even though Ford has spent millions advertising and branding itself. Even cheapusedcars.com is better because people will look for that.

You have to find a good domain name registrar, not a cheap domain registrar. Cheap means cheap in the field of domain names. Your domain name is important. Spending $ 25 a year on a registrar who offers more services and quality VS spending $ 10 or less at a cheap registrar is what we are talking about here. If this extra $ 15 a year will make or break your home business, then maybe you should not start one.

Then you will need a web hosting service. Again, cheaper is not better. There are good hosting services for $ 100 a year or even a little less. Anyone who offers you hosting for less than that should trigger a red flag. Choose and pay for at least a year, just as you have registered your domain name. If you are going with a monthly plan, you are probably not fully engaged in your new home business.

Now you have your domain name and hosting your new website, but where is the website and how can I get it? You have several options. You can learn HTML and build your own. You can use a WYSIWYG editor like FrontPage to create your own website. You can hire someone to build your website for you.

First, let’s talk about learning HTML to build your own website for your home business. There is a learning curve here. This is the best option of the three that I mentioned above, but it takes time to learn. You will probably not be operational in a few days with this option. In the long run, it will save you a lot of money to learn HTML and build your own websites. The more websites you have in your wallet, the more you will have at least one who will be a big winner. Writing your own code means that you can create a new site as often as you want.

Then build your own home-based business website with a WYSIWYG publisher. (What you see is what you get). These editors are similar to creating a document. Everything is visual and you do not need to

Code a piece.

Then hiring a web designer to build your home business website is another option. A professional website designer knows how to give your website the look and feel you need. However, be careful when choosing a web designer. I will add a few things that you need to be aware of here;

1. If they say they will register the domain name for you, say no. Registering a domain name is not technically difficult. Do it yourself. Many web designers register the domain name at the cheapest place they can find, then charge you $ 100 or more per year for the domain name. Then, many of them record it in their own name! This will cause you huge problems if you decide to stop using their services. The domain name should always be in your name.

2. Ask them which program they use to build your website. If they will be using FrontPage or Dreamweaver or another WYSIWYG publisher, you may as well build your own home business website. If they do not write HTML from scratch, then they should not be in the web design business.

3. If they want to bill you monthly to run your website for you, be careful. Do not sign annual contracts. Their job is to build you a home business website. Let them stick to that. Most designers are just designers. They are not search engine gurus, business leaders, or anything else. Hire a designer to design and others to do what they are good at.

4. Do not let them talk about features you do not need. Just like used car salesmen, they will try to make you add a lot of bells and whistles you do not need.

5. A brochure website is one that is basically designed to just let people know what products or services you are providing and to contact you for more information. Usually it’s a main page, a page about, and a contact page. It should not cost you more than $ 500.

6. If you are going to add the ability to purchase your product or service by paying for it through your home-based business website, then it becomes an ecommerce website. Again, pay attention to the bells and whistles that the used website seller is trying to sell you. PayPal is a good option when you are starting out. You can get a PayPal account easily. You can create your own purchase buttons and insert them into your website with the code they provide without being an HTML guru. You can even set the shipping costs and everything else via PayPal for free. They charge small percentages per sale, but the services they provide are worth it. In addition, they have no setup fees or monthly fees like other e-commerce solutions. When your sales volume reaches thousands of dollars a month, you can look for a better solution, but until then, use PayPal.

7. An old adage among those who make money on the web is “You build the first for the show and the rest for the dough”. What does this mean? You will probably be very concerned about the appearance of your website at first, but the design is the least important aspect of your home web business. Many will disagree, but who cares? Let me repeat, design is the least important aspect of your home business. A beautiful website without traffic becomes uglier every day. An ugly website with the traffic that makes money becomes more beautiful by the dollar. Create a total budget for your home web business. Do not spend more than 30% of this budget on design. Spend the rest of your website promotion, advertising and other actions that bring you customers. Do not let a designer tell you that his design is more important than the success of your home-based business.

Now that your domain name, hosting and website are up and running, you now need customers. Where do you find them? I have my website, will not they find me now? NO, they will not do it.

There are many things you can do to get traffic. You can buy AdWords from Google, MSN (coming soon), or Yahoo. This sends you traffic from people who are looking for specific keywords. Pay attention to bidding and set your spending limits until you see what keywords will earn you.

hong kong drainage channel company The stock market is simply a gathering of people exchanging shares of companies. Shares of companies are issued to raise money for the company. Stock Market A Wall Street education is the best education you can get in this day and age considering how most colleges just overcharge and underdeliver.

An Overview of Initial Coin Offering (ICO)

ICO is a means of raising funds in unregulated means for different cryptocurrency ventures. It is something that startups use so as to bypass the regulated and rigorous capital raising process that banks and venture capitalists require. In such a campaign, a given percentage of the cryptocurrency is sold to the project backers very early for other cryptocurrencies or legal tender.

How it is done

When a firm wants to raise money using the initial coin offering, there needs to be a plan on white paper stating the details of the project. It should outline what the project is about, what the project needs, what it aims at fulfilling completion. It should also state the money that will be needed so as to undertake the whole venture and how much pioneers will get to keep.

The plan also has to mention the kind of currency accepted and how long it intends to run the campaign. During such a campaign, the supporters and enthusiasts of the initiative will buy the cryptocoins using virtual currency or fiat. The coins are called tokens and are very similar to company shares that are sold to investors during IPOs. If the minimum funds required are not reached, then the money is refunded and the whole ICO is then considered not successful. When requirements are met within a set timeframe, the cash can be used to initiate the scheme or even complete it if it was still progressing.

The investors who take part in the project early are mainly motivated to buy crypto coins hoping that the plan will be successful and after launching they will get more value from it. There have been very successful projects of this kind in different economies and that is one main thing that motivates investors.

Similarities

ICOs can be compared to crowdfunding and IPOs. Just like the IPOs, a stake has to be sold by a startup company so as to come up with funds that will aid the operations of such a company. The only difference is the fact that IPOs deal with investors while ICOs work closely with supporters who are very keen about new projects just like the crowdfunding event.

However, ICOs are different from the crowdfund in the sense that the backers of ICOs are usually motivated by the fact that they may get a great return on the investment. The funds raised through crowdfunding are basically donations. It is for this reason that ICOS are referred to as crowd sales.

There have been many successful transactions so far. The ICOs are an innovative tool within our digital era. However, it is important for investors to take precaution since there are some campaigns that can turn fraudulent. This is due to the fact that they are highly unregulated. Financial authorities do not take part in this and if you lose funds through such initiatives, it is hard to follow up so as to get compensation.

Looking To Start A Working From Home Job

Digital technology-email and smartphones most of all-have vastly improved workers’ capacity to be productive outside of a traditional office. Even so, most white-collar work still happens in an office. In practice, modern communications technology is used just as much to link physical workplaces together-as at Slate, which maintains two offices, one in New York and one in D.C.-as to disperse them. One reason is that, according to a new survey of office workers conducted by Wakefield Research for the IT consulting company Citrix, most bosses are dubious about the telecommuting. Half of workers say their boss disapproves of remote working, and only 35 percent say it’s tolerated.

Skeptical bosses will likely have their doubts re-enforced by the same survey, which shows that 43 percent of workers say they’ve watched TV or a movie while “working” remotely, while 35 percent have done household chores, and 28 percent have cooked dinner.

Physical proximity might not be necessary for much work, but it does remain a hard-to-replace deterrent against The Price Is Right while on the clock.

My experience working primarily from home for an extended period several years back was that it’s a surprisingly efficient way to drive yourself insane. The need to make petty decisions-where to work, which chair to sit in, should I even bother to get out of bed, do I need to be wearing shoes right now-became overwhelming. I’d spend completely unreasonable amounts of time wondering what to do for lunch, and while working on a book dedicated a surprising amount of energy to meeting my self-imposed daily word quota in time to catch movie matinees.

But there is also a compelling case to make that working at home makes people much more efficient, because it allows workers to take care of annoying little chores while still getting their jobs done. Remote working-at least occasional remote working-can be great precisely because of the opportunity it affords to get a certain amount of non-work stuff done. It’s much faster to shop for groceries at a quarter to three than to stand in line during the after-work rush. Far too many people work similar schedules and want to eat dinner at dinnertime. My neighborhood supermarket turns into a nightmare from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday late afternoon, another popular shopping time, is even worse, with the aisles often featuring Soviet-style shortages of key commodities. If you just start working a bit earlier (no commute, after all) and pop by the store during a lull when lines are short, you can get both more work and more shopping done in a fixed amount of time. Even better, if more people did that, then shift workers with genuinely inflexible schedules might also be spared some line pain.

And telecommuting allows you to tackle household tasks that take up a lot of time but don’t actually involve much work. Watching laundry spin in your washer or dryer is perfectly compatible with productive work. But between the washing step and the drying step comes a time-sensitive “put the wet clothing in the drier” phase. Taking just a few minutes off from work to do the swap lets you get the chore done efficiently, and leaves your actual leisure time free for exciting activities like leaving the house. Many recipes, similarly, involve considerable periods of simmering or roasting during which it’s good to be around the house but you don’t actually have to do anything. In a “work-then-shop-then-cook-then-eat” paradigm, it’s challenging to eat anything that can’t be made quickly. But if you can simmer while you work, then a lot of household labor can be accomplished with minimal reduction in professional output.

The fact that such practices remain officially taboo reflects how far we haven’t come as a society from the days when we expected every full-time professional to be backstopped by a full-time homemaker.

More broadly the Wakefield survey suggests that employers may be missing a low-cost way to give workers something of value. Sixty-four percent of survey respondents who haven’t worked remotely “identify at least one extremely popular perk or pleasure they’d be willing to give up in order to work from home just one day a week.” The fundamental fact of the modern economy is that no matter how much technology advances or society’s wealth improves, we don’t add more hours to the day and we still need to sleep. Under the circumstances, tactics that help people save time are not only valuable but increasingly so with every passing year. Smart firms need to find ways to acknowledge that and let their employees have enough flexibility to manage their time effectively.